Blood and Paint X: The Crimson Harvest – A Mammoth Predator, Part 3 (Head)

Time to headbang! When last we left him, the Mammoth Predator was all body and no head. While that might be the ideal for some people, our gargantuan needs a head that weighs nearly as much as his body.

 

“If you stick a pumpkin on my neck stump, I will throw it at you.”

 

First, let me get this out of the way: I watched way too much Predator when I was coming up with this design. It grabbed me by the brain-sauces, and inspired me to modify the Gladiator in my battlebox as well (as you’ve seen). So I will freely admit to stealing/borrowing the design off of the Preds.

 

“My face, my beautiful face … and horns. And … geez, man, what the hell are you doing to me?!”

 

First off, this is the revenge of not dry-fitting everything carefully enough. I realized, after building the torso and the support system for the blood tanks, that the horns and protrusions for the head didn’t fit with the back piece and glass vials. Rather than bemoan it, I took advantage of the problem and turned it into an imaginative boon. I was never happy with the huge bone plate thing behind the helmet on the Mammoth’s head, so I decided to dremel down the flesh and bone bits and make the whole blasted thing a helmet! It fits well with the Predator theme, and although I didn’t do the space-dreadlocks, it worked out well. The problem became that I wanted the Predator teeth, and if I wanted to do the mandible-tusks like my Gladiator, I was going to run into a serious obstacle. Unlike the Titans, the tusks for the Mammoth are a mixture of resin and metal. The far cooler tusks were resin, and I came up with a way of cutting them down (cut out all the bone stuff) that made them the perfect size. But I needed four of them, not two. What to do? Instant Mold again! This was going to be trickier than the thigh plates, though, as I’d have to cast it in two pieces rather than just a single one. I also needed teeth, but I was lucky enough to have a bunch of Legion I was trading away, including a Throne of Everblight. It had the perfect upper jaw, and I felt that I could use it as the mouth with a judicious use of the Instant Mold and some luck. So I cast and cut them, and filled the spaces, and carved carefully, and …

 

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Success! It’s a little rough, but serviceable. I’l use the greenstuff-tusks as the bottom pair, so hopefully they draw slightly less attention than the upper set. I’m very careful to not pair the greenstuff and ‘natural’ resin tusks together, as that would highlight any imperfections.

 

 

I returned to the head itself, and greenstuffed the obvious holes. Here’s where it got sweaty for me: I’m terrible at sculpting armor. Absolutely rubbish. So I cheated! I decided to do the armor in sections and put them together, then greenstuff the gaps. First, I roughed out the area with a pen. Then my wife loaned me a metal triangular wedge thingy (technical term there). I rolled out my greenstuff on a flat ceramic plate and cookie-cuttered that thing with plenty of lube and excess material (giggity). With my polyblade I estimated a pretty decent set of straight bits, and then when it was all dry cut to fit. How did it work?
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Pretty damn  well! I ended up using the parallel strips on the sides and greenstuffing the gaps to the triangle and head, as it made a perfect ridge to represent the edge of the helmet. The main section of the head is pretty scarred up, but that’ll go well for a battle helmet. Although the cut-down Titan head looks really obvious in the picture, the rivets make a natural transition to the lumpy middle section, and it goes along with the general Skorne armor aesthetic (er, I mean Orgoth hehe). Time to bring it all together!
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Predator, eat your heart out … or let the Mammoth do it. This piece is amazingly sturdy, as it should be. Between this and the upper torso from the last article, I ran through another tube of greenstuff. Double tusks count for ‘original’ Mammoth pieces again, right? Right? Oh well, let’s put this on the neck and see what we get!

 

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Big boom, baby! He is looking sweet … if by ‘sweet’ I mean utterly horrific, which of course I do. Despite how massive the head is, it feels proportional to Mr. Happy Pants, and he certainly looks ready to party. While he does stick out somewhat over his base (far more than the original horn idea), it’s in a way that makes it unlikely to hit anything other than other gargossals. Additionally, the tusks themselves are still in the right general place, lending itself even more to the conversion guidelines.

 

Next time we arm him with the triforce, er, blood cannon!

 

–MK

 GEARTEETH HCO Signature

 

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